Evolutionary selection shapes bird song learning

David Lahti, NA , Queens College

Day: 2018-12-07

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Proactive interference and scene memory consolidation

Timothy Elmore, NA , City College of New York

Day: 2018-11-30

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Action sequencing: learning, performance, and goal-directed control

Eric Garr, NA , NA

Day: 2018-11-16

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Examining Relations between Executive Functions and Literacy in Adolescents

Individual Differences in Statistical Learning as Assessed by SRT and ASRT Tasks Teresa Ober, & Elizabeth Che NA, NA , College of Staten Island

Day: 2018-11-09

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Improving Performance through Narrative Identification

Shannon Pinegar, NA , NA

Day: 2018-11-02

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Learning to Predict ‘What’ and ‘When’ an Event Happens

Andy Delamater, NA , Brooklyn College

Day: 2018-10-19

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


How Similar are the Grammars between Two-Year-Olds and Their Parents?

Virginia Valian, NA , Hunter College

Day: 2018-10-12

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

By comparing the spontaneous speech of two-year-olds and their parents, we can determine whether, and to what degree, their grammars differ. This talk uses two case studies to argue that two-year-olds and their parents have the same basic grammar. Children are similar to their parents, without directly copying their parents. Children differ from parents in executive functions (like planning and updating) more than in grammar. With respect to basic grammar, I argue that nothing develops. What develops is vocabulary and executive function.


Drawing and STEM Learning: Can tracing improve number recognition in preschoolers?

Katie Papazian, NA , NA

Day: 2018-10-05

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Why conservation needs comparative cognition: Elephants, pangolins and pandas

Josh Plotnik, NA , NA

Day: 2018-09-28

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


The Representation and Processing of Emotional Concepts in Chinese-English Bilinguals

Junqing Chen, NA , NA

Day: 2018-09-21

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Pattern and Process in Cultural Evolution

Mason Youngblood, NA , Queens College

Day: 2018-09-14

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3207

NA


Language Acquisition & Use

Language Acquisition & Use Language Acquisition & Use Emilia Ezrina, Qihui Xu, & Josephine O’Malley NA, NA , Hunter College

Day: 2018-09-07

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room @ GC: 3306

NA


Mindsets, Motivations and Memory: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Approach

Jennifer Mangels, Full Professor , Baruch College

Day: 2018-04-27

Time: 2-3pm

Room @ GC: 4419

Top-down control processes ideally serve to direct attention to goal-relevant information, which in the case of learning, can increase the likelihood that information is successfully encoded into long-term declarative memory. The motivational goals that students carry into learning situations can thus influence the information they attend to, how they appraise this information, and ultimately what they retain. In this talk, I will present research that integrates various social-cognitive theories about students’ beliefs and goals for learning and achievement with cognitive neuroscience theories of attention and memory. In particular, I will focus on some key findings from my lab that show how mindsets and motivations, whether measured as individual differences or experimentally manipulated, influence processing of feedback and learning opportunities in the domains of factual knowledge and mathematics.​


Online Language Processing in Bilingual Heritage Speakers: Insights from the Visual World Paradigm

Irina Sekerina, Full Professor , College of Staten Island

Day: 2018-03-23

Time: 2-3pm

Room @ GC: 4419

In this presentation, I will give an overview of the Visual World eye-tracking Paradigm (VWP) by situating it in the brief history of eye-tracking, describing its key properties, and summarizing the main research topics. I will address practical aspects of learning the VWP, including types of eye-trackers (ISCAN, Tobii, SMI, EyeLink) and research projects with children that employ the VWP.


Eye-tracking and Physiological Markers of Face Processing in Infants at High Risk for Autism

Jennifer Wagner, Assistant Professor , College of Staten Island

Day: 2017-12-08

Time: 4-5pm

Room @ GC: 6304.01

Studies have found that infant siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a 1 in 5 chance of also developing ASD as compared to 1 in 68 in the general population. The present research prospectively follows a group of infant siblings of children with ASD to look at visual attention and pupillometry in response to faces during the first year of life and to examine how these responses might relate to later development.


Maintaining Information in Working Memory: The Pause that Refreshes?

Evie Vergauwe, Ambizione Research Fellow , University of Geneva

Day: 2017-11-03

Time: 4-5pm

Room @ GC: 6304.01

Working Memory (WM) keeps information temporarily accessible for ongoing cognition. Our main question is concerned with how information is kept active in WM, that is, how people can counteract short-term forgetting of relevant information. One proposed mechanism to keep information active in WM is refreshing. Refreshing is similar in many aspects to verbal rehearsal but is assumed to be more domain-general, not related to speech, and attention-based. Although many studies on refreshing have been published over the last few years, there is not much direct evidence for the existence of the process and its characteristics are still poorly understood. Most studies have examined refreshing by examining how the process affects recall performance of relevant information at the end of a trial. We propose an alternative, more local, approach in which we examine the effect of refreshing while it is taking place, rather than after it has taken place. I will present a series of studies in which behavioral and neurophysiological indices were used to examine locally when and how refreshing is used to maintain relevant information in WM.


The Curious Case of Emotion and Verbal and Spatial Working Memory and Capacity

Justin Storbeck, Associate Professor , Queens College

Day: 2017-10-20

Time: 4-5pm

Room @ GC: 6304.01

NA